Market 322: Giulietta Sprint -some assembly required

Update 2/5/14: This is the car I referred to in the write up of the super rusted out Sprint a few days ago.  Get that and this and you would have the basis for a doable project.

Screen Shot 2014-02-06 at 12.28.36 PM

Update 2/1/12: Body appears to have sold for $3800 -this didn’t include much of anything to build the car out.

Update 11/19/11:  This one is back on eBay.   Seller will ‘part it out in 7 days’ if it doesn’t sell.

It’s a drag all the way around.  Car has had a lot of work done to a reasonable standard -that’s how they usually look after welding -it’s the skimming/undercoating/grinding/seam-sealer and paint that makes it look good.  Seller probably has X amount of hours, 100 I’d guess, probably paid $2500-3500 for the car before they started working on it, and they could have as much as $3-4000 in parts in it.  I think they work on these cars for a living, so they really need to not put themselves out of business selling this car, so they need a certain minimum amount.  If they keep working on it and it fails to sell, it gets more complicated since they are more $ into it.  This is why you don’t start a project like this unless you can finish it -you’ll never break even.

Update 9/11/11:  See?  Include all the parts, sell the kit. etc just like I said.  Look at that, might actually sell.  My old hood latch -well, actually Aaron’s, is in the last picture.  Small world.

Giulietta Sprint 750B 1493*08650This car is on eBay right now out of southern California.  3 days to go, $1000 opening bid and no bidders doesn’t bode well for it so far.  I think the problem here is that the small parts are not included in the auction -available for an additional $5000 to the buyer of the car and while a lot of metal work has been completed, there is more to do.  These leave it incomplete in many ways.  I empathize with the seller who has invested a lot of time and energy gathering parts -a few from my eBay sales even -but this is the hardest type of car to sell.

Looks to have started life as a Celeste car.  Body appears to be coming along nicely with the hood fitting well and the fender lip nice and clean.

This is where they go wrong -rusting around the edge of the trunk  and under the battery.  Trunk lid fits good.

New trunk floor is pretty standard for a neglected Sprint. 

It’s no fun working on the dashes of these cars -lots of sharp corners and tight spaces.  Not nearly as frustrating as the first series 750B with its non-removable dash top.

Looks good here too.  This car would have rockers that are open in the bottom and as such not nearly as prone to rust as the later closed rocker car.  Not sure why they changed.

If you’re in Southern California and in the market for a project Sprint -this might be a something you want to consider.  Buying a car in this shape means you get to haggle quite a bit.

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6 thoughts on “Market 322: Giulietta Sprint -some assembly required

  1. This is only 19 cars away my build date. I’d love to have had this as a spare, but have already done all the serious things it required. This one is only about $40,000 short of being done. At the time, there was a Sprint parts car inTexas for about $1500. In retrospect, that would been a real bargain, and I could have saved hundreds of hours on eBay!

    • One mans parts car becomes another mans project. I rather enjoy the small parts hunt -makes for a lot of little conquests along the way rather than one big one.

      How’s the car coming? I’d like to do an update on it in a ‘where are they now’ vein.

      Thanks,
      Matt

  2. it’s painted and plumbed, with all suspension on it. Wiring starts next week (ugh!) I’ll send some pix. ( I know I’ve disappointed all the “more pure” groups due to my color choice, so I’ve been reluctant to post much of it)
    Thanks for asking Matt.

    • It’s your car Bob -do what you want with it and be proud of it. It’s a little bluer than I would have chosen, but I didn’t chose. I’m happy to see it treated so well coming from such a sad starting point.

      Matt

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