Market 251: Apart for 40 years 1955 750B Sprint

Update 8/18/10: That was fast.  I didn’t see a ‘Buy it Now’ option last night when I wrote this up and now the car has been sold for $8995.  Probably a better deal for the buyer than seller, but if the buyer is half way around the world it’s an $11,000 + transaction by the time it’s in the garage.

Giulietta Sprint 750B 1493*01365, 1315*01432 (not included -blank replacement instead). Just when you thought the last worthy early Sprint project had been unearthed and sold and you missed your chance -another comes along, just like this one available on eBay now.  Just imagine tracking down all the original Fontana and Lobo nuts and bolts!

I’ve been waiting for this day since 1967 when I was stripped, acid dipped and parked in a cement floor garage -at least that’s my best translation of 1950’s Italian.  Very straight nose on this guy!Rear end looks as straight and ready for skim and paint as the front.  The light gray around the windows is lead or some sort of body solder.

This is from when the dash top was part of the body and not removable -made working under the dash fun.  It’s an illness I know, but I can’t help but want this car.  I’m going to have to write a post about projectophilia.

Some of you are saying something along the lines of ‘Oh -good heavens!’ but this rust is not too bad.  I fixed similar on my Giulietta SS.

This car is utterly apart.  I had a dream where I got every single little part of my SS cleaned, painted/plated or whatever and once everything was done put it together like a puzzle.  May still happen.

Jeez, I’m watching Zardoz as I write this and having trouble concentrating -stupid Netflix streaming…

Engine is a 750 series and the trans is a tunnel case.  Too bad it’s not the original block for the car.

Hey baby – nice gauges!  Gotta love an old guy that needs the label gun to tell him how fast he’s going.

Even the data plate is in great shape.

As the driver of a regular old 101 Sprint with a regular old 101 1300 in not very exciting but decent enough condition, who knows and embraces the charms of ‘as intended’ Sprints, I have been waiting for a car like this to come along, and here it is and it’s too bad I’m not ready yet to buy one…

What do you think?

2008 Sprints

2009 Sprints

and one from 2010…


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6 thoughts on “Market 251: Apart for 40 years 1955 750B Sprint

  1. Well Matt,
    At least that temptation eluded you. Check out the seat fabric in the blow-up photos #13! Luuigi could easily outwit that rust!
    Another siren will send you her call in your future…
    Laurence

  2. Matt, While others will write, “What a good deal!”
    I will comment that this car was basically sacrificed to the “acid dip” in 1967 … possibly the true reason why it has remained un-assembled for all these years.
    These chassis’s have aluminum alloy reinforcement enclosed within the front frame rails. Without these, the front suspension will be as effective as if it were bolted to a tub of Jello. Acid dipping destroys these alloy members as well as removing the rust and paint – a less than ideal process.

  3. Agree with GTD, acid dipping effectively dissolves the alloy structural reinforcings in the upper & lower chassis rails. Not a good plan for retaining structural integrity.

    Agree with Brad, this car should be a column shift, I’d guess it was converted when the motor was swapped out, the only way to tell would be from the original steering column shroud and if the LHS chassis rail has the locating point for the column shift linkage mounting adjacent the gearbox. From what we do know, the floor shift arrived in early ’56

    • I’d want to run a test where I dip a sample of the alloy in the acid used and see how much was lost. I’m thinking the alloy would stand up to the acid for much longer than the paint etc. it didn’t dissolve the alloy/lead body seam filler much.

      Just a thought -and yes, probably was a column shift as I have yet to see a floor shifter this early.

      Matt

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