101 1300 rebuild part #12: The devil in the ongoing details

The build goes ever on. I had been resisting working on the Sprint for the last two weeks and concentrated on organizing and consolidating my parts, tools and the like. Yesterday I had a surprise few hours of freedom so I decided to run to the shop and get back on the Sprint. The first order of business was hooking up the new exhaust front section I got in the mail a few weeks ago. I used M8 x 1.25 stainless socket head cap screws with flat and lock washers I had laying around to bolt the exhaust to the manifold with an NOS copper gasket in between sourced locally. I needed help supporting the exhaust to get the bolts started but after that it was easy. The pipe is closer to the floor than I like so I will have to see if it’s a motor mount, engine mount or pipe bend problem once everything is installed.

img_7741Here’s the new pipe mounted to the manifold with the asbestos heat shield bent out of the way. The oil pressure line is very close to the header with the heat shield in between. I plan on seeing if the pressure line can be bent or turned on the banjo bolt.

img_7742This is my last peek at the clutch and flywheel before the cover goes on. I still need to figure out where the oil temp wire got to. I also put 3.2 pints of expensive 75W90 ns fully synthetic transmission oil in the gearbox while laying on the floor to take this picture. Fill plug is a 15mm hex.

img_7745I took this picture because I couldn’t see the motor mount threads through the hole behind the suspension assembly. I think I will remove the nut and put a fender washer in there to protect the sheet metal of the body. It’s really hard to do anything in this pocket as my hands are not as small as they once were.

img_7746I took when the drivers side front wheel was back on to remind myself what a cool car it is.

img_7747The carb and airbox seen here are the subject of my next post so you will have to wait to hear about them. Still to do in this picture are the upper radiator hose, wiring to the distributor and a double check of the cam timing.

img_7748It’s hard to see here, but this has the old style reverse lockout that requires a special shift lever and some ball bearings I am still trying to find. More on this later too undoubtedly. I had a friend sit in the car and put it in gear then engage the clutch. I was able to push the car with the clutch in and when he let it out the car stopped. Small victory: the clutch works!

Three hours and I am that much closer but I still can’t see the end of the project. The list of things to do keeps having entries crossed out, but new entries keep getting added to the end of the list. I would be really happy if I could start this thing by the end of the week, but I don’t want to hurry myself.

Future posts will include Weber 28/36 DCD rebuild and set up, sorting out the rest of the wiring, verifying the cam timing, checking all the nuts and bolts are tight, filling with oil and cranking it up to check oil pressure and flow to the cams and a few other little jobs I needed to do before I even started this rebuild like crossed turn signal wires that result in an emergency flasher response to use of the signals in either direction, intermittent voluntary windshield wipers, and a lack of weatherstripping around both doors. Stay tuned.

Click here to go to Part #13, the Weber DCD clean up.
Click here to go back and read Part #11.

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1 thought on “101 1300 rebuild part #12: The devil in the ongoing details

  1. Dear Matt,

    It’s cool to watch your efforts and Patrick Hung’s on your parallel sets of projects documented so nicely (photos for the illiterati)!

    Keep the revs up,
    Laurence

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