Market 540: Sprint Veloce 750E 01861 – numbers matching – assembly required

Update November 30, 2016:  This car exceeded estimates by a bit, selling for 151,200 Euros or $160,046.  Parity approaches!  I’m going to say this was a good deal for both parties to the sale.  The seller got more than they were expecting (if the estimates were no artificially low) and the buyer bought a car that will one day be a million euro’s if trends continue.

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Thank you Marco Pestana for sending the link, and for keeping the vintage Alfa revs up in general!

October 19, 2016: Giulietta Sprint Veloce 750E 1495*01861, 1315*30052, 77052.  This early Sprint Veloce is being auctioned at the same time as Spider 00016 at Duemila Ruote November 27 – 29 2016, in Italy.  I bet some of you were expecting this write up today.

I have only had opportunity a few times to write about a project Alleggerita Sprint Veloce over the years – mostly because these have been expensive cars for a long time.  These were $100,000 cars when you could get a good original Sprint Speciale for less than $20,000, and buy a decent house in Oakland for $350,000.  Project in terms of a Sprint Veloce Alleggerita usually means raced half to death, rebuilt, raced half to death again, rebuilt again, over and over in what could be many cycles over many years.  It’s not uncommon for original engines to have gone missing, replaced hopefully by a Veloce block with a “near neighbor” VIN.  Also typically gone are the special lightweight seats and other bits that prove a challenge (satisfying challenge I imagine) to source.

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When was the last time you saw a Sprint Veloce Alleggerita in this condition? Not you two guys – you have them in your garage – that’s not fair! The last and only one I recall is the burned out project in Southern California of a few years ago. Never heard whether it was a real one verified by numbers, or what happened to it. Anyone? This car looks pretty good! Once benefit of frequent racing is the heat cycles, care and track inspection requirements keep rust at bay. This thing will probably be in bare metal by Christmas.

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Market 553: This Spider 01381 raced SCCA F production with Shankle sponsorship

Giulieta Spider 750D 1495*01381.  Available today on eBay, still wearing signature period paint, is the Shankle sponsored Blizzard Performance Production F Giulietta Spider.  It raced SCCA F Production back in the day when it was a grassroots professional thing that you had to attend to see races, and “regular guys” could set up and race.  Seriously race.  I can’t say what the demand for a car like this is.  Since I have kept this blog I have seen a few sell for way less than I thought they ought, and a few sell for way more.  I guess supply and demand forces of the market will let us know.

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I feel like I’ve seen these period pictures before.  That’s a serious attachment to the nose – I wonder if it worked?  Neat old pick up back there too.

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Market 552: 1980’s Time warp Spider Veloce 1600 390342

Giulia Spider Veloce 1600 10118*390342, 00121*02224.  This Southern California Spider (since 1989 anyway – who knows is chequered past from whence college prior?) is available from Chequered Flag on ebay with a $71,500 instant gratification price, and a $40,000 reserve not met starting point.  It presents very well in the manner of a car that saw use as stylish transport in ages past, without much regard to recent phenomena of collect-ability or value – it probably changed hands in 1989 for a few thousand dollars.  The seller is spot on when they say it is owed a serious restoration -at least paint and some corrections, but it remains to be seen if the selling price is such that that restoration makes financial sense.  Cheque it out!

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Looks great.  Borrani wheels, Talbot style mirror, straight nose ridge – what’s not to like?  

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Market 549: SZ 00072 – project auctioned in France

Update November 16, 2016: The process of democratic capitalism has spoken – this car sold for 288,000 Euros; $307, 414 Trump Box at time of writing.  Occasional correspondent Stuart shares this insight: “From bitter experience I can tell you that to restore an SZ properly you have to de-clench all the aluminium panels as there is electrolytic action between the unprotected steel tubing and the skin of the car. Leaving original panels in place is not really an option. And that is only the start!

How much all this costs is anyone’s guess but it will be a significant sum….the real question is will it come close the value put on an SZ by FJ?”

I know some collectors who have salaried staff maintaining and restoring (how do I get that gig??) their investments, maybe the cost is simply a craftsman’s wages for a year.

November 10, 2016: Giulietta Sprint Zagato (SZ) 10126*00072.  Contrasting considerably with market 548 (and estimated to be considerably less expensive) is this project SZ that was auctioned in France by Aguttes on November 5, 2016.  I hunted around for a result, but have yet to find one.  Anyone here catch it?

The car has an interesting early history, but has spent most of it’s life waiting for recovery from a wreck in 1968.  An SZ in project form is a rarity these days, most having been sniffed out by clever car hunters.  Taking on the task of seeing an SZ project through to completion is not for everyone – there are parts needed that simply must be produced from scratch – that might as well be made out of gold.

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Not your average grocery-getter.  I’m curious to see the other side of the nose where repairs were made.  If the nose was wrecked, where did the trim seen here come from?  Wasn’t there a car found in Caracas and listed on ebay out of Los Angeles a decade ago that looked like this?

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Market 14: “1961 Concours 101 Sprint” 20825

Update November 11, 2016.  This car is listed on ebay again out of Greenville South Carolina.  It’s funny to read my old write up – so earnest!  This car has been improved a tiny bit – most notably with Sprint seats being added, but still has a few things that could be improved if the new owner so desired.  Or not.

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Still a good looking example.  This dealer had a Giulietta TI listed recently.  Very little distortion on the side of the body in the reflection.  

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Market 551: Tidy early Spider 01594

Giulietta Spider 750D 1495*01594, 1315*41667.  This lovely example is available now on eBay out of Illinois.  These very early 750D’s are about as blue chip as a classic gets – they are mechanically simple, surprisingly fast, and can be quite reliable.  As the description points out, this is a largely original example, without the usual “upgrades” such as a split case 5 speed, or disk brakes.  As these cars continue to be discovered by collectors, originality to spec will hold more value.

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If you showed me this picture and said it was 40 years old I’d believe you except maybe it would have a bit of a sepia tone to it.  Node looks really well balanced and straight – hard to achieve on a car that has seen any work.

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Market 550: SZ 00102 – another fine specimen

Giulietta Sprint Zagato (SZ) 10126*00102, 00120.  Paul Russell and Company (thanks for pointing them out Frank) have on offer the George Fogg III delivered SZ, one of only 6 delivered new to US based customers.  Provenance is extensive as one would expect, but that can probably be said of pretty much all SZ’s – even the fakes!  I say this not to diminish the history and individuality of a car like this, but SZ’s are like presidents – even those of lesser accomplishment have stories to tell.  Price is $495,000 (about $275 per pound), soberly reasonable compared to the other three I’ve had the honor of mentioning this month.  Four SZ’s is just under 2% of SZ production.  Have I mentioned all four are red?

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I see a lot of Miata’s and the like with the yellow tow hook and arrow.  It’s cool because of cars like this.  Headlight rims are aluminum along with most of the rest of the car.  I bet Zagato weighed tires before settling on a set.  

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